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Tutor: Sam

Summary

Conjunctions

In a nutshell

Conjunctions are words that introduce a clause or "glue" two clauses together in a sentence.



Coordinating conjunctions 

Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two or more (main) clauses together. The simplest example of this is the word and, but there are some more that you should know.


Examples
  • and
  • but
  • for
  • nor
  • or
  • so
  • yet


Compound sentences

You might already know that a complex sentence is one that contains at least one main clause and one subordinate clause. A compound sentence contains two or more main clauses, glued together using coordinating conjunctions like the ones listed above.


You can tell if a sentence is a compound sentence by taking away the coordinating conjunction and putting a full stop. If both sentences would make sense on their own, you've got yourself a compound sentence.


Examples

Main clause 1

Main clause 2
Mum got angry and Jack heard her.
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
and
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
I wanted to buy some new trainers but they were too expensive.
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
but
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions



Subordinating conjunctions

A subordinating conjunction begins a subordinate clause, e.g. The dog ate the cake since he was hungry


Examples
for
as
since
therefore
hence
consequently
though
due to
provided that
because
unless
once
while
when
whenever
where
wherever
before
after


In these examples, notice which type of clause makes sense on its own, and which one does not. Which one contains the subordinating conjunction?


Examples
Main clause
Subordinate clause


I won't buy any new trainers 
unless I can afford them.
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
Before she rides her bike,
the girl will test her brakes.
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions


 


Relative subordinating conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions might also begin a subordinate clause in order to add more information about a subject, e.g. The woman whose dog ate the cake, 


Examples
  • that
  • which
  • who
  • whom
  • whichever
  • whoever
  • whomever
  • whose


In the following examples, notice the commas that separate the different clauses.


Examples

Main clause (part A)...
Subordinate clause
...Main clause (part B)
1.
The man,
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
who had his birthday last week,
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
got on the bus.

English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
2.
The cheese,
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
which was French,
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions
was eaten by the dog!
English; Sentences; KS2 Year 3; Conjunctions


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Exercises

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FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions

What are subordinating conjunctions?

What are coordinating conjuctions?

What are conjunctions?

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