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Organisation: bullet points, lists and paragraphs

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Tutor: Joel

Summary

Organisation: bullet points, lists and paragraphs

​​In a nutshell

Organisational and presentational features help readers to follow and understand the information that is being shown. In this summary, you will learn different devices and techniques for organising a text.



Organisational devices 

Organisational devices are features used within a text to present important information to a reader in a clear and easy-to-understand structure. Here are all the different organisational devices that can be used in a text.


Bullet points

Bullet points are a great way of listing key information without having to write full sentences.

  • If your bullet point is in full sentences make sure to still use capital letters and correct sentence punctuation.
  • You can use semi-colons to separate complex nouns if they are used in your list.


Numbered lists

Numbered lists work in a similar way to bullet points: they help by breaking down information into small chunks. These are great for making lists or ingredients for a recipe, for example:


  1. 4​ tbsp self raising flour 
  2. 4 tbsp caster sugar 
  3. 2 tbsp cocoa powder
  4. 1 egg
  5. 3 tbsp milk
  6. 2 tbsp chocolate chips (optional)
English; Writing skills; KS2 Year 5; Organisation: bullet points, lists and paragraphs


Headings and subheadings

Headings and subheadings allow the reader to find specific information that they are looking for. In this summary, you can already spot the headings and subheadings, for example:

  • Heading: How to organise a text 
  • Subheading: In a nutshell 


Paragraphs

Paragraphs are groups of sentences within a piece of writing. A new paragraph starts once a new topic is being introduced. Normally, it is a rule of thumb to have one point per paragraph.



Organising paragraphs around a theme

Paragraphs help to organise writing so it is easier to read. They are used in writing to introduce new characters, new stories or new information.

  • A new paragraph always starts on a new line. 
  • A new paragraph is signalled by missing a line and by indentation.
  • Paragraphs have no set length.


Example

On November 2nd​, the Northern Lights were seen in Norway. The colourful display has dazzled people for as long as there have been people to see it. For people who live in countries in the Northern Hemisphere, where the Northern Lights occur, seeing it is common. But for others, witnessing this natural phenomenon is a once-in-a-lifetime event. Many take a special trip just to see it.

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Exercises

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FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions

Why are paragraphs useful?

Why are headings and subheadings used?

What are organisational devices?

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